Investigation

A people in the way of progress

Investigation

Bitter coffee

Investigation

Broken Promises

News

The Resettled

This investigation is the first of two parts of a journalistic investigation carried out in Kenya from March 2-11 2016, where ngo’s, politicians, experts in land rights and indigenous peoples’ rights and community members have been interviewed by an international collaborative team of journalists. Desk research, including data collection through Freedom of Information Act, research in this field as well as interviews with experts on human and land rights was conducted from December 2015 - May 2016. Partners in Lake Turkana Wind Power project have had the opportunity to be interviewed and furthermore comment on the findings of this investigation prior to the publishing date.

Read: A people in the way of progress

Danwatch travelled to Brazil’s largest coffee-producing state, Minas Gerais, where half of Brazil’s coffee is grown. We visited coffee plantations, interviewed coffee workers, trade unions, experts and local authorities.

Danwatch accompanied the police and the Brazilian Ministry of Labour and Employment on an inspection of a Brazilian coffee plantation where seventeen men, women and children were found to be victims of human trafficking and were freed from conditions analogous to slavery. Two children, ages 14 and 15, had also worked picking coffee on the plantation.

Read: Bitter coffee

‘Broken Promises’ is a journalistic investigation based on desk research and expert interviews conducted in May 2015, and on field research in Tete province and Maputo, Mozambique, in June 2015. During field research, Danwatch interviewed several community members from the resettlements in Mualadzi and Cateme who blame mining companies and the government of Mozambique for not living up to the commitments they made in the community resettlement process from 2010 until the present. A documentary, ‘Promised Land’, was produced based on the findings from Mozambique in this report.

Read: Broken Promises

At least three of Europe's biggest steel companies are buying coking coal from mining companies in the Tete province in Mozambique where the government and mining companies in 2010 resettled 736 families to the areas Cateme and Mualadzi. Browse the photos and read the stories about the people that now live without adequate access to food, water and jobs.

Read: The Resettled

News

News

Brazilian coffee is sprayed with deadly pesticides

In Brazil, coffee may be sprayed with pesticides that are illegal in the EU because they are acutely toxic and cause disease. Many workers apply pesticides without sufficient protective equipment, and pesticide poisoning is widespread. Even the drinking water contains traces of these dangerous pesticides.

News

You may be drinking coffee grown under slavery-like, life-threatening conditions

Brazil’s coffee industry has serious problems with working conditions that are analogous to slavery, life- threatening pesticides and scarce protective equipment. Danwatch has confronted the world’s largest coffee companies with the facts of these violations. Jacobs Douwe Egberts admits that it is possible that coffee from plantations with poor labour conditions ended up in their products, and coffee giant Nestlé acknowledges having purchased coffee from two plantations where authorities freed workers from conditions analogous to slavery in 2015.

News

Coffee workers apply pesticides without protection

Francisco Paulo Pereira used to apply pesticides on a coffee plantation in Minas Gerais in Brazil without protective equipment. Today he is very ill and cannot feel the ground when he walks. Hear him explain how he learned to use pesticide by reading the label on the bottle.

News

Coffe workers must sign blank documents

40-50 percent of coffee workers in Brazil are working without a formal contract giving them the right to pension and sick leave. Hear coffee worker Elisabete Vitor da Costa explain how she was forced to sign blank documents instead of an official contract during the coffee harvest in 2014.

News

Google grants Danwatch 50.000 euro for ‘Open Supply Chain project’

Google Digital News Initiative has granted Danwatch 50.000 euro for the development of a mapping tool, Open Supply Chain, which will map the supply chain for products and make data transparent to consumers.

News

Danske Bank removes Bank Hapoalim from exclusion list

It made headlines around the world when Danske Bank in early 2014 excluded Israeli Bank Hapoalim from its investment portfolio over Hapoalim’s ties to Israeli settlements. Now, two years later, Danske Bank is ready to invest in Bank Hapoalim again. Danwatch has tried to find out why.

News from the world

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The Tragedy of Textile

Miserable working conditions and ruined lives

Theme

Business on Illegal Ground

Danish business in illegal settlements

Theme

Lethal IT

IT workers in Asia are paying a high price for Europe’s cheap computers

Investigations

Investigation

A people in the way of progress

Investigation

Bitter coffee

Investigation

Broken Promises

Investigation

Servants of Servers

Higher education institutions in Western Europe have spent 4.27 billion euros so far in 2015 on ICT hardware, software and services to secure quality education for millions of young Europeans. At the other end of the supply chain tens of thousands of Chinese students work as interns in the assembly lines of IT factories every summer producing for the world’s biggest brands. Many of them are forced into internships and cannot quit or they will not graduate.

Investigation

The Dark Side of canned Tomatoes

Serious exploitation and illegal immigrants behind canned tomatoes

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